Toril by Laurent Teyssier (2016)

A thriller wherein the emotions grab you by the throat.

Young man’s struggle with life, love, duty towards his father and desperate attempts at saving the family agricultural business.

What originally begins as long exposition, ends up a masterpiece of managing the audience expectations at exactly the right pace.

Feature debut and a really good mature film.

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Julie by Alba Gonzalez de Molina (2016)

Julie is French and for some reason ends up in the Pyrenees looking for an escape from the world.

There is a small village where she is welcomed with open arms and houses .

She quickly accommodates to the local customs and habits. She does, however, hide a secret. And when the secret comes out she loses the trust of the locals.

A peaceful study of loneliness and being lost in the world. Beautiful film. And a debut.

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Paris Tower 13 by Thomas Lallier (2016)

Documentary on cultural event of the year in Paris in 2013.

A gallery owner invites over 100 street artists to convert an abandoned block of flats set for destruction into an art gallery that will only be open to the public for one month.

The author became one of the artists involved in the project being the filmmaker among them.

A beautiful story – very vivid imagery and a statement that art is an important element of our lives.

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Putin Forever? by Kyrill Nenashev (2015)

Documentary on Russian protests against falsifying the results of presidential elections in 2012.

Estimated budget of $2000,00 (two thousand).

It is fascinating, shocking and eye opening. I personally haven’t heard of 2012 white marches engaging millions (sic!) in Moscow and other places in Russia.

A definite recommend.

 

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Bridget Jones’s Baby (2016) by Sharon Maguire

Bridget Jones is the old spinster we know. This time over 40, however, managed to reach perfect weight over the years. This film is a drift from Helen Fielding’s book “Mad About the Boy”, where Mark Darcy is dead and Bridget is widowed with two kids.

Here Mark Darcy is alive and kicking with second (sic!) wife with the looks of a clothes rack. And we all meet at Daniel Cleaver’s (sic!) memorial… Jokes aside – supposedly Hugh Grant wasn’t going to participate in this project. He is replaced by the one and only Dr. McDreamy (it seems, one more time Helen Fielding got to have a silver screen crush into her stories – well done M’am!).

One incredible addition here is that Emma Thompson (herself!) has been invited to collaborate on the writing team. As a result (chicken and egg problem, not sure what came first – the role, or her writing?) – we have received an amazing comic role of renowned actress as Bridget’s OB. Amazing dialogues! Great experience.

What I like about this film – we have wrinkled romance. Apparently people in their 40’s and 50’s also fall in love, and know how to laugh at themselves. Having gained so much distance over the years definitely helps. I love this new Bridget. Perhaps now more, than ever before. Great stuff!

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10.000 km by Carlos Marques-Marcet (2014)

A simple film with two characters of a long time couple whose lives get to be changed because of the woman’s scholarship in far California.

Calm and wise story proving that distance doesn’t matter – if something isn’t right, physical closeness or physical distance won’t change anything.

The story would probably end up the same way if one of the character didn’t move across the globe but say begin to work harder and be more absent in the house.

Universal truth is that sometimes we keep being with someone just for the sake of it. Because of being accustomed to them and everyday life together. And sometimes it just doesn’t work.

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“LOLO” by Julie Delpy (2015)

Funny, smart, intriguing – intense dialogues and a surprising turn of events. Something I like to see in comedy.

It’s reminded me of Woody Allen, but it’s lighter, more feminine. Just like Julie Delpy is a lighter, more feminine artist than Allen.

At first it is not obvious as to why the title character is not present at the beginning of the movie, but then gradually we find out why he is so important to the main protagonist – Violette played by Julie Delpy herself.

 

Very pleasant film to watch on a Saturday afternoon and like Two days in Paris – I will be getting back to this film with pleasure.

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