Tag Archives: paris

Paris Tower 13 by Thomas Lallier (2016)

Documentary on cultural event of the year in Paris in 2013.

A gallery owner invites over 100 street artists to convert an abandoned block of flats set for destruction into an art gallery that will only be open to the public for one month.

The author became one of the artists involved in the project being the filmmaker among them.

A beautiful story – very vivid imagery and a statement that art is an important element of our lives.

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Filed under film reviews, Warsaw Film Festival 2016

“LOLO” by Julie Delpy (2015)

Funny, smart, intriguing – intense dialogues and a surprising turn of events. Something I like to see in comedy.

It’s reminded me of Woody Allen, but it’s lighter, more feminine. Just like Julie Delpy is a lighter, more feminine artist than Allen.

At first it is not obvious as to why the title character is not present at the beginning of the movie, but then gradually we find out why he is so important to the main protagonist – Violette played by Julie Delpy herself.

 

Very pleasant film to watch on a Saturday afternoon and like Two days in Paris – I will be getting back to this film with pleasure.

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Filed under 2015 cinema releases, film reviews

La Vénus à la fourrure (Venus in Fur) by Roman Polanski (2013) #WFF2013

Emmanuelle Seigner et Mathieu Amalric in a claustrophobic drama set on stage of a seemingly abandoned theatre somewhere in Paris.
Amalric takes on the role of Polanski himself – just like Owen Wilson does in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris”.
Emmanuelle Seigner is herself. Obviously the above two statements are probably oversimplifications but this is definitely how the film feels.
Emmanuelle Seigner plays an actress (sic) and Mathieu Amalric a stage director (yeah) during a dangerous casting taking abrupt turns as the game of power unveils. What begins as typical male dominated situation ends up in total submission to the weaker sex.
It is a close study of two characters confined in an enclosed space. Not bad. But not much exceptional either.

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Filed under 2013 cinema releases, film reviews, Warsaw Film Festival 2013

Le bonheur (2013) by Fabrice Grange #WFF2013

This film, unlike a few others watched during the Warsaw Film Festival 2013, treats people who have all they need and instead of searching for freedom, new lives or jobs, seek new challenges in everyday life.
Told in first person voice over, shot in black&white over the roofs of Paris, inside Parisian flats, underneath Parisian trottoirs.

What initially could be interpreted as a tale of one spoiled 30-something married woman, who is not accepted by her family (especially the Mother), and whose husband is absent more than not, providing her with all her material needs, becomes a disturbing tale of setting one’s borders in a relationship with another person. Alice tries many things which may be attempts for fighting the rejection of her parents. At one point she agrees to anything suggested by her friend/lover Jean who also cheats on his wife and family. Somehow, Alice’s case seemingly bears no ethical questions, whereas Jean seems to have some sort of a guilty conscience towards his family. Alice does not. And it is not clear whether her goal to reach happiness has been met by the end of the story.

Certain points presented here might perhaps be more appreciated by those who have seen and experienced the French New Wave. Some may leave the cinema shocked – perhaps by the coldness of the Alice character and her openness to anything – both carnal and spiritual.
This film makes one uneasy and it is not obvious as to exactly why. However, this is yet another perspective on contemporary consumerist society, devout of values, where boundaries are only set by another person’s conscience.

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Filed under film reviews, Warsaw Film Festival 2013

Culture Shock by Steve Balderson (2012) #rdff

Lightweight comedy bringing to mind Scooby Doo group of teenage friends solving criminal mysteries.

Four twenty-something Americans are forced by their parents to visit Europe ‘as adults’. That means they have to deal with issues by themselves rather than ring parents for help, who refuse to pick up their calls.

Realised in a true indie spirit – most of the film was shot on a handheld digital camera. A list of thankyous is quite long – mainly to locations. Apparently the cost of the film did not exceed £3000. And yet, it is a nice dose of entertainment.

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Filed under film reviews, Raindance 2012

Before Sunset by Richard Linklater

The lovely sequel to the one set in Vienna – Before Sunrise.

The action opens 9 years after the events of the original film. Same actors, only Vienna is replaced by Paris.

Ethan Hawke’s character wrote a book inspired by the Vienna night and comes to Paris to promote it. Celine pops in to the bookshop and they set on a walk. Turns out the French girl did not make it to their appointment at the railstation as they had agreed as she had her grandma’s funeral to go to. Jesse did wait for about 3 days wandering around but finally gave up. At present he is married and has a daughter.

They walk throughout Paris, take on a boat to finally end up in Celine’s flat listening to Nina Simone. A lovely story beautifully lit by the afternoon sunshine. Another film happening respecting the classical rules of the unity of action  time and place.

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Filed under Catching Up, film reviews

The Darjeeling Limited by Wes Anderson

One more to the Catching Up section.

I have never been to India, but couldn’t escape the impression that the presented world is very far from how India actually looks.

As I found out later reading the trivia section on IMDB page, I was right. Apparently the vast majority of the first draft of the script was written without the writer ever going to India.

The world presented is an idyllic vision of India which is colourful, stylised and incredibly clean.

It tells the story of three brothers; Francis, Peter and Jack (apparently named after Francis Ford Coppola, Peter Bogdanovich and Jack Nicholson) who take upon a spiritual journey, which term is quoted enough times to make sure that the audience knows it to be irony.

The three brothers are Owen Wilson (since watching ‘Midnight in Paris’, I will always perceive him as Woody Allen), Adrien Brody (he is an amazing comedian!), Jason Schwartzman (barefoot again – just like in ‘I <3 Huckabee’ – will need to investigate whether this is a permanent feature…).  Natalie Portman is a girlfriend in an episodic role – in fantastic shape with short boyish haircut.

Great smart comedy with amazing colours, interior design and a play with convention. Recommend!

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Filed under Catching Up, film reviews