Tag Archives: owen wilson

The Darjeeling Limited by Wes Anderson

One more to the Catching Up section.

I have never been to India, but couldn’t escape the impression that the presented world is very far from how India actually looks.

As I found out later reading the trivia section on IMDB page, I was right. Apparently the vast majority of the first draft of the script was written without the writer ever going to India.

The world presented is an idyllic vision of India which is colourful, stylised and incredibly clean.

It tells the story of three brothers; Francis, Peter and Jack (apparently named after Francis Ford Coppola, Peter Bogdanovich and Jack Nicholson) who take upon a spiritual journey, which term is quoted enough times to make sure that the audience knows it to be irony.

The three brothers are Owen Wilson (since watching ‘Midnight in Paris’, I will always perceive him as Woody Allen), Adrien Brody (he is an amazing comedian!), Jason Schwartzman (barefoot again – just like in ‘I <3 Huckabee’ – will need to investigate whether this is a permanent feature…).  Natalie Portman is a girlfriend in an episodic role – in fantastic shape with short boyish haircut.

Great smart comedy with amazing colours, interior design and a play with convention. Recommend!

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Midnight in Paris by Woody Allen

One of those films that should really be watched more than once to appreciate all the little tricks and layers of meaning.

After a too long introductory scene of shots of Paris, which can only be forgiven because it’s a Woody Allen, the audience gets immersed into a seemingly typical Woody Allen set. There’s a clever guy hopelessly trying to prove that this other man drawing to him the main guy’s woman is a loser. Surprisingly, this time Woody Allen is played by Owen Wilson. And very successfully. Maybe making a point that Allen’s ideas do not age and his characters are stuck somewhere between 35 and 43 with the eternal and universal every day issues of jealousy, pose, snobbism and inconvenient truths. Also the in-laws and their superior nonchalant treatment of the main character as if he weren’t an adult man responsible for his deeds and actions. A beautiful comedy of manners. As always.

There is more.

There is the philosophical trip through time where the main protagonist realises that being hooked on the past may not be the solution to living in the present.

There is an incredible mind game questioning his existence. What he sees and whom he meets becomes the best ever riddle and proper entertainment for those a little interested in the work and the great minds that resided in Paris during the Golden Age between WWI and WWII. An absolute must to anyone who a) appreciates Woody Allen and b) is fascinated by 20th century literature and philosophies.

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Filed under 2011 cinema releases, film reviews